Cool Family Meals images

August 1, 2015 · Posted in Family Meals · Comment 

A few nice family meals images I found:

Thanksgiving 2012 121122 054
family meals
Image by photofarmer
Family

The Fam at Dragos
family meals
Image by johnprieur
Amazing dinner at Dragos Seafood Restaurant in Metairie.

Nice Family Meals photos

June 25, 2014 · Posted in Family Meals · Comment 

Some cool family meals images:

Lynch at Family and MWR Command SOS Training Conference, U.S. Army, 100808
family meals
Image by familymwr
PHOTO CAPTION: IMCOM Sarah Lynch stands with her husband Commanding General Lt. Gen. Lynch Rick Lynch as he speaks at the Survivor Outreach Services Annual Training Conference in August. (Photo by Rob McIlvaine, FMWRC Public Affairs, cleared for public release, not for commercial use, attribution requested.)
www.armymwr.com
SOS training conference shares best practices with global staff and partners

By Rob McIlvaine
FMWRC Public Affairs

ARLINGTON, Va. – Over 300 Survivor Outreach Services representatives from the Active Army, Reserves and National Guard converged on the nation’s capitol for their annual training during the second week of August.

The conference hosted team building opportunities so the Active Army, Army National Guard, Reserves, Casualty Assistance Centers’ staffs and SOS teams could share best practices with each other.

It also provided an opportunity for non-government organizations to meet SOS staff and provide insight on their work with survivors.

According to Donna Engeman, FMWRC SOS program manager, SOS is one of the Army Chief of Staff Gen. George W. Casey’s top priorities. Casey, who lost his father in Vietnam, developed the idea for a better support system for survivors of fallen service members in late 2006.

“Because taking care of survivors is one of Gen. Casey’s top priorities, it’s imperative that we have the right people in the SOS positions in the field. We also need to give them the best training, tools and resources possible in order for them to care for survivors,” Engeman said.

One of those tools introduced at this conference was a draft of the SOS Operations Manual.

“The Operations Manual provides guidance, sort of a standard operating procedure. Another purpose of the training was to update our team members on the latest changes in entitlements, policies and regulations regarding survivors,” Engeman said.

At the conference, Fort Hood’s SOS team and center were given the spotlight to tell their story and share what they’ve learned since their program became official in May, 2009.

Through the efforts of Lt. Gen. Lynch, who began growing and evolving survivor outreach while serving as III Corps and Fort Hood commander, was later tapped to be IMCOM commanding general by Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey,

“SOS is the most important program the Army has and the Fort Hood SOS program center is what ‘right looks like,’” Lynch told the gathered SOS representatives.

“We’re going to fully fund this program, and we’re going to increase output at a reduced cost. And you’re going to tell me if we’re doing the right thing for our Families of the fallen because it worries me to death that there might be one Family out there who fear they’ve been forgotten,” Lynch said.

But the Army can’t do it alone.

At the training, Lynch mentioned that volunteers, local businesses and nonprofits are ready, willing and available right outside the gate.

“The community wants to help. Private organizations want to help. We have to give them the opportunity to help. They know they enjoy freedom because of the sacrifices paid by Gold Star Families and they want to give back as much as they can,” Lynch said.

After Lynch secured a building large enough to allow expansion of Fort Hood’s SOS program, garrison funds only went so far.

Newly appointed SOS Program Manager Janeth Lopez immediately went out into the community to create program awareness. Soon after, furniture and appliances were donated, a Family room was improved and the adjoining kitchen took on a Family atmosphere.

“But when you go out to make presentations,” Fort Hood SOS Support Coordinator Connie McDonald said, “You won’t have to tell what you need. You’ll be asked, ‘what do you need,’ and ‘how can I help?’” McDonald said.

“Think about offering the possibility of sponsoring a meal if having a Family day or planting a tree of remembrance during an annual Family gathering, but be aware of your installation and its assets, such as trees needing lots of water. And know the regulations on what to tell people who want to donate,” McDonald said.

During August of last year, the Fort Hood SOS expanded into a larger facility that provided room for a growing staff and range of programs. This expansion also allowed for the creation of the Hall of Remembrance dedicated to the fallen heroes.

Survivors were asked to bring in or send an 8”x10” photo or artist’s rendering of their loved one to be framed and placed on the wall with a metal plaque.

McDonald provided information and guidance to the conference participants on how to manage a Hall of Remembrance, including tips from participants in focus groups such as “please don’t place the photo on the wall at a height that causes someone to look down.”

In fact, one of the “best practices” shared at the conference was the recommendation to use focus groups to ensure SOS programs are meeting the needs of the survivors.

“Some of the garrisons may have focus groups organized in order to receive survivor feedback on issues they face. At the Department of the Army level, we have the CSA’s Survivor Working Group which provides advice and comments on the SOS program,” Engeman said.

Another best practice shared is the creation of a record of fallen soldiers at the unit level.
“This register goes with the colors at the change of command ceremony and signifies that the fallen will forever be assigned to this command and the Families will continue to be part of this unit,” McDonald said.

“You are all advocates for our Soldiers and survivors. Make senior leaders realize that all of our Soldiers will be remembered for how they chose to live, not how they died,” McDonald said.

For more information, visit Army OneSource at www.myarmyonesource.com/familyprogramsandservices/familyp…

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

Lynch at Family and MWR Command SOS Training Conference, U.S. Army, 100808
family meals
Image by familymwr
PHOTO CAPTION: Sarah Lynch stands with her husband IMCOM Commanding General Lt. Gen. Lynch Rick Lynch as he speaks at the Survivor Outreach Services Annual Training Conference in August. (Photo by Rob McIlvaine, FMWRC Public Affairs, cleared for public release, not for commercial use, attribution requested.)
www.armymwr.com
SOS training conference shares best practices with global staff and partners

By Rob McIlvaine
FMWRC Public Affairs

ARLINGTON, Va. – Over 300 Survivor Outreach Services representatives from the Active Army, Reserves and National Guard converged on the nation’s capitol for their annual training during the second week of August.

The conference hosted team building opportunities so the Active Army, Army National Guard, Reserves, Casualty Assistance Centers’ staffs and SOS teams could share best practices with each other.

It also provided an opportunity for non-government organizations to meet SOS staff and provide insight on their work with survivors.

According to Donna Engeman, FMWRC SOS program manager, SOS is one of the Army Chief of Staff Gen. George W. Casey’s top priorities. Casey, who lost his father in Vietnam, developed the idea for a better support system for survivors of fallen service members in late 2006.

“Because taking care of survivors is one of Gen. Casey’s top priorities, it’s imperative that we have the right people in the SOS positions in the field. We also need to give them the best training, tools and resources possible in order for them to care for survivors,” Engeman said.

One of those tools introduced at this conference was a draft of the SOS Operations Manual.

“The Operations Manual provides guidance, sort of a standard operating procedure. Another purpose of the training was to update our team members on the latest changes in entitlements, policies and regulations regarding survivors,” Engeman said.

At the conference, Fort Hood’s SOS team and center were given the spotlight to tell their story and share what they’ve learned since their program became official in May, 2009.

Through the efforts of Lt. Gen. Lynch, who began growing and evolving survivor outreach while serving as III Corps and Fort Hood commander, was later tapped to be IMCOM commanding general by Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey,

“SOS is the most important program the Army has and the Fort Hood SOS program center is what ‘right looks like,’” Lynch told the gathered SOS representatives.

“We’re going to fully fund this program, and we’re going to increase output at a reduced cost. And you’re going to tell me if we’re doing the right thing for our Families of the fallen because it worries me to death that there might be one Family out there who fear they’ve been forgotten,” Lynch said.

But the Army can’t do it alone.

At the training, Lynch mentioned that volunteers, local businesses and nonprofits are ready, willing and available right outside the gate.

“The community wants to help. Private organizations want to help. We have to give them the opportunity to help. They know they enjoy freedom because of the sacrifices paid by Gold Star Families and they want to give back as much as they can,” Lynch said.

After Lynch secured a building large enough to allow expansion of Fort Hood’s SOS program, garrison funds only went so far.

Newly appointed SOS Program Manager Janeth Lopez immediately went out into the community to create program awareness. Soon after, furniture and appliances were donated, a Family room was improved and the adjoining kitchen took on a Family atmosphere.

“But when you go out to make presentations,” Fort Hood SOS Support Coordinator Connie McDonald said, “You won’t have to tell what you need. You’ll be asked, ‘what do you need,’ and ‘how can I help?’” McDonald said.

“Think about offering the possibility of sponsoring a meal if having a Family day or planting a tree of remembrance during an annual Family gathering, but be aware of your installation and its assets, such as trees needing lots of water. And know the regulations on what to tell people who want to donate,” McDonald said.

During August of last year, the Fort Hood SOS expanded into a larger facility that provided room for a growing staff and range of programs. This expansion also allowed for the creation of the Hall of Remembrance dedicated to the fallen heroes.

Survivors were asked to bring in or send an 8”x10” photo or artist’s rendering of their loved one to be framed and placed on the wall with a metal plaque.

McDonald provided information and guidance to the conference participants on how to manage a Hall of Remembrance, including tips from participants in focus groups such as “please don’t place the photo on the wall at a height that causes someone to look down.”

In fact, one of the “best practices” shared at the conference was the recommendation to use focus groups to ensure SOS programs are meeting the needs of the survivors.

“Some of the garrisons may have focus groups organized in order to receive survivor feedback on issues they face. At the Department of the Army level, we have the CSA’s Survivor Working Group which provides advice and comments on the SOS program,” Engeman said.

Another best practice shared is the creation of a record of fallen soldiers at the unit level.
“This register goes with the colors at the change of command ceremony and signifies that the fallen will forever be assigned to this command and the Families will continue to be part of this unit,” McDonald said.

“You are all advocates for our Soldiers and survivors. Make senior leaders realize that all of our Soldiers will be remembered for how they chose to live, not how they died,” McDonald said.

For more information, visit Army OneSource at www.myarmyonesource.com/familyprogramsandservices/familyp…

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

Lynch at Family and MWR Command SOS Training Conference, U.S. Army, 100808
family meals
Image by familymwr
PHOTO CAPTION: IMCOM Commanding General Lt. Gen. Lynch Rick Lynch speaks at the Survivor Outreach Services Annual Training Conference in August. (Photo by Rob McIlvaine, FMWRC Public Affairs, cleared for public release, not for commercial use, attribution requested.)
www.armymwr.com
SOS training conference shares best practices with global staff and partners

By Rob McIlvaine
FMWRC Public Affairs

ARLINGTON, Va. – Over 300 Survivor Outreach Services representatives from the Active Army, Reserves and National Guard converged on the nation’s capitol for their annual training during the second week of August.

The conference hosted team building opportunities so the Active Army, Army National Guard, Reserves, Casualty Assistance Centers’ staffs and SOS teams could share best practices with each other.

It also provided an opportunity for non-government organizations to meet SOS staff and provide insight on their work with survivors.

According to Donna Engeman, FMWRC SOS program manager, SOS is one of the Army Chief of Staff Gen. George W. Casey’s top priorities. Casey, who lost his father in Vietnam, developed the idea for a better support system for survivors of fallen service members in late 2006.

“Because taking care of survivors is one of Gen. Casey’s top priorities, it’s imperative that we have the right people in the SOS positions in the field. We also need to give them the best training, tools and resources possible in order for them to care for survivors,” Engeman said.

One of those tools introduced at this conference was a draft of the SOS Operations Manual.

“The Operations Manual provides guidance, sort of a standard operating procedure. Another purpose of the training was to update our team members on the latest changes in entitlements, policies and regulations regarding survivors,” Engeman said.

At the conference, Fort Hood’s SOS team and center were given the spotlight to tell their story and share what they’ve learned since their program became official in May, 2009.

Through the efforts of Lt. Gen. Lynch, who began growing and evolving survivor outreach while serving as III Corps and Fort Hood commander, was later tapped to be IMCOM commanding general by Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey,

“SOS is the most important program the Army has and the Fort Hood SOS program center is what ‘right looks like,’” Lynch told the gathered SOS representatives.

“We’re going to fully fund this program, and we’re going to increase output at a reduced cost. And you’re going to tell me if we’re doing the right thing for our Families of the fallen because it worries me to death that there might be one Family out there who fear they’ve been forgotten,” Lynch said.

But the Army can’t do it alone.

At the training, Lynch mentioned that volunteers, local businesses and nonprofits are ready, willing and available right outside the gate.

“The community wants to help. Private organizations want to help. We have to give them the opportunity to help. They know they enjoy freedom because of the sacrifices paid by Gold Star Families and they want to give back as much as they can,” Lynch said.

After Lynch secured a building large enough to allow expansion of Fort Hood’s SOS program, garrison funds only went so far.

Newly appointed SOS Program Manager Janeth Lopez immediately went out into the community to create program awareness. Soon after, furniture and appliances were donated, a Family room was improved and the adjoining kitchen took on a Family atmosphere.

“But when you go out to make presentations,” Fort Hood SOS Support Coordinator Connie McDonald said, “You won’t have to tell what you need. You’ll be asked, ‘what do you need,’ and ‘how can I help?’” McDonald said.

“Think about offering the possibility of sponsoring a meal if having a Family day or planting a tree of remembrance during an annual Family gathering, but be aware of your installation and its assets, such as trees needing lots of water. And know the regulations on what to tell people who want to donate,” McDonald said.

During August of last year, the Fort Hood SOS expanded into a larger facility that provided room for a growing staff and range of programs. This expansion also allowed for the creation of the Hall of Remembrance dedicated to the fallen heroes.

Survivors were asked to bring in or send an 8”x10” photo or artist’s rendering of their loved one to be framed and placed on the wall with a metal plaque.

McDonald provided information and guidance to the conference participants on how to manage a Hall of Remembrance, including tips from participants in focus groups such as “please don’t place the photo on the wall at a height that causes someone to look down.”

In fact, one of the “best practices” shared at the conference was the recommendation to use focus groups to ensure SOS programs are meeting the needs of the survivors.

“Some of the garrisons may have focus groups organized in order to receive survivor feedback on issues they face. At the Department of the Army level, we have the CSA’s Survivor Working Group which provides advice and comments on the SOS program,” Engeman said.

Another best practice shared is the creation of a record of fallen soldiers at the unit level.
“This register goes with the colors at the change of command ceremony and signifies that the fallen will forever be assigned to this command and the Families will continue to be part of this unit,” McDonald said.

“You are all advocates for our Soldiers and survivors. Make senior leaders realize that all of our Soldiers will be remembered for how they chose to live, not how they died,” McDonald said.

For more information, visit Army OneSource at www.myarmyonesource.com/familyprogramsandservices/familyp…

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

Cool Family Meals images

June 16, 2014 · Posted in Family Meals · Comment 

Some cool family meals images:

Nags Head 2012 Memoirs 166 – My Racing Crew
family meals
Image by Counselman Collection
Our son and daughter-in-law chose this location for this year’s spring trip to the Outer Banks of North Carolina, putting us right on the ocean front beach. It was a great location right beside Jeanette’s Pier, and the weather was so sunny. There were some windy days that made the waves all that much better. Besides our family from Ohio, we had friends visiting from several Congregations neighboring ours, plus a family that drove from mid-Texas and another from Indiana. As usual, we took turns making meals and it was a great experience with everyone fellowshipping and working together peacefully. Yes, I had one conference call with World Headquarters I did not want to miss, but it was still total relaxation. I tried to go a whole day without touching a camera, but then I got the shakes, and I just had to grab a camera and start snapping again; when you are hooked, you are hooked. To see photos from our past visits to Nags Head see the set of photos in our Travel Collection called Nags Head Memoirs; they are all dated.
www.flickr.com/photos/counselman/sets/1707339/

Heidi at Nikki Birthday Meal
family meals
Image by rjjm
DCFC0021.JPG

Family at Eleven City Diner (Chicago, Illinois)

June 14, 2014 · Posted in Family Meals · Comment 

Some cool family meals images:

Family at Eleven City Diner (Chicago, Illinois)
family meals
Image by cseeman
Great meal! Great company. At the S. Wabash location for Sunday dinner.

Nice Family Meals photos

April 29, 2014 · Posted in Family Meals · Comment 

Check out these family meals images:

Paul Inspects the Menu
family meals
Image by Wootang01
With my friend Paul, I spend five days in Osaka, Japan. The trip provided much refreshment, and excitement, not to mention many challenges. It was my first visit to the country, and, I feel, it certainly won’t be my last, as there are still many places left to see, and so many new things to learn.

We had several destinations highlighted on our itinerary, the foremost of which was Universal Studios. We spend an entire day there, going on rides and more often than not, queuing for them. The excruciating wait times were worth it, however, for such exhilarating fun, especially on the Hollywood Roller Coaster, my personal favorite. The next morning we followed up that successful endeavor with a trip to the Himeji Castle, a place which came highly recommended by my colleague, whose succinct description of the heritage site was, "awesome." Indeed, as a history buff, I enjoyed walking the storied grounds and climbing through the maze-like interior of the keep which was designed not so much to comfortably house the royal family as to confound the invading enemy. The castle is a must-visit. Other attractions of note include the Osaka Aquarium, and the Tennoji Zoo; both teemed with animals of every shape and size. We also at length ventured into several shopping districts inside of which were myriad stores, selling all sorts of fashion and gadgetry, countless restaurants and several gambling parlors – the Japanese, it seems, love their slot machines as much as the Hong Kong Chinese love their horse racing. Lest I forget, we frequented several video arcades to play the latest and greatest games; Paul played well, while I more often than not got 0wn3d. There is a lot to do in Japan.

Japanese culture, of which I’ve heard so much, really is distinct and separate from other Asian cultures. Their patterns of action and their peculiar artifacts certainly aren’t the same as those which feature prominently in Hong Kong. For one thing, the MTR culture was more civilized and less stressful: people queued up for trains and let passengers alight first before permitting themselves to board; cellphones never rang and cabin cars were as quiet as bedrooms at midnight; and to imagine all of these people enforce their norms without public service announcements, without any coddling, conspicuous signs – that’s amazing. What proved difficult was trying to find a garbage can. It was easier to find a vending machine, from which one could purchase a variety of drinks or cigarettes, than a bin in which to dispose of these delectable, perishable goods.

As for the general citizenry, they were most accommodating and hospitable, with several individuals going out of their way to help Paul and I find our way around the dense sprawl of the city. Language wasn’t a concern despite our limited Japanese; amazingly enough, our comfort was their concern! I won’t forget their selfless service, as one day, I hope, I’ll be able to return the favor. That the girls were quite attractive and that I demonstrated a propensity to ask attractive girls for directions go without saying; however, I understand now that their sexiness and sophistication stem not from comely faces but coherent attire. Rather than adorn themselves like a typical Mong Kok girl in a ridiculous neon rainbow palette, with jeans or unseemly spandex underneath dresses, skirts or other tops better left to stand alone, Japanese girls opt for more somber, sensible colors – black and cream-colored – and what’s more, they aren’t afraid to whip out the tasteful pantyhose or to show some skin, even. We had plenty of time to ogle the ladies, and to their credit, freezing temperatures weren’t enough to dissuade many of them from forsaking, icing their shorts, as we saw countless pairs being worn on the street. That’s what I call fashion professionalism!

Overall, Japan is a marvelous little land full of the eccentric, as well as the endearing. It was a fascinating place to explore, and I’m thankful that it was done in the company of my friend , with whom candor was not at a premium. We both learned a lot and look forward to the next trip!

Meal
family meals
Image by Scuddr

Luncheon, commonly abbreviated to lunch, is a midday meal.
family meals
Image by Yarden Sachs
Family denotes a group of people affiliated by consanguinity, affinity or co-residence.

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