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“Eat Your Colors Salad” Recipe

July 23, 2012 · Posted in Recipes · Comment 

A few nice recipes images I found:

“Eat Your Colors Salad” Recipe
recipes

Image by cproppe
Close up of organic salad made today from Farmer’s Market fruits and veggies, and backyard flowers, herbs & tomotoes.

Split Pea Soup (Recipe)
recipes

Image by Ruthieki
This soup was a mainstay in my house when I was growing up. The end result is thick, delicious, and happens to be exceedingly healthy and fat free. The total ingredient cost, assuming you’ve already got the spices, is around three dollars. Also happens to be vegan, but don’t let that scare you off. This soup disappears from the fridge faster than any of the other soups I’ve made this year.

Split Pea Soup
1 package of green split peas (2 1/2 cups)
8 cups water
2 cups chopped onion
3 carrots, peeled and chopped
1 large potato, chopped
2 ribs celery, chopped
2 bay leaves
1 tsp thyme
1 tsp marjoram
1 tsp salt

Rinse the peas throroughly, and put them in a large soup pot with the water over high heat. Meanwhile, chop all the vegetables and add them to the peas. Add the spices.

Lower the heat so the soup is just at a simmer, and let it cook, stirring ocassionally, for about two hours. The split peas should completely dissolve and the soup should thicken. Taste, and add salt and black pepper to taste.

Vintage Ad #716: Grandma’s Greatest Recipes and Fry’s Cocoa
recipes

Image by jbcurio
Source: Canadian Living, November 1979

Cool Cookbook images

July 21, 2012 · Posted in Cookbook · Comment 

A few nice cookbook images I found:

Vegetarian recipes cookbook – Okonomiyaki
cookbook

Image by wherefishsing
Food painting art from the vegetarian cookbook full of easy, delicious and YUM meatless meals. Free vegetarian dinner recipes for everyone at www.wherefishsing.com/cookbook
Original artwork is available for purchase in the Official Art Store

Vegetarian recipes cookbook – Pesto
cookbook

Image by wherefishsing
Food painting art from the vegetarian cookbook full of easy, delicious and YUM meatless meals. Free vegetarian dinner recipes for everyone at www.wherefishsing.com/cookbook
Original artwork is available for purchase in the Official Art Store

Cool Low Carb Recipes images

July 20, 2012 · Posted in Low Carb Recipes · Comment 

Some cool low carb recipes images:

Camp FRESH 2010

July 18, 2012 · Posted in Healthy Food Choices · Comment 

A few nice healthy food choices images I found:

Camp FRESH 2010
healthy food choices

Image by Christiana Care
Until this summer, Javiar Emory-Turner had never seen a tomato that wasn’t red.
At Camp FRESH, the 16-year-old Wilmington youth is not only tasting tomatoes that are yellow, green and orange, he is helping to grow and sell the produce.

Even more important, Javiar is taking the lessons he is learning about eating healthy home to his family and neighbors, encouraging them to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables each and every day.

"Before, I only ate fruits and vegetables about once a week," he said. "Now, I’m trying new foods that are healthy. I’m cutting back on sugar. I’m getting exercise."

Started by Christiana Care, Camp FRESH is a nine-week program for 48 young people ages 13-18 from Wilmington, New Castle and Newark, Del. The corner stores in their communities carry few fresh fruits and vegetables, and getting to larger markets with more food choices is sometimes difficult. These young gardeners from city neighborhoods till the soil at Wilmington Urban Farm, a verdant plot bursting with broccoli and bok choy, carrots and cabbage, zucchini and zinnias. By growing and eating healthy produce, the teens grow a healthy respect and appreciation for the value of nutrition, and they model their new respect for nutrition to others in the community, who also improve their diets-and, ultimately, their overall well being.
Christiana Care launched Camp FRESH in 2006 as part of the health system’s efforts to build an awareness of the value of nutrition, make a dent in obesity and improve the quality of life for these participants.

Two days a week, the teens sell produce at two stands in urban neighborhoods, one at the farm on East 12th Street and the other at Wilmington Hospital. On the other days, the youths gather at the Eugene du Pont Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation Institute, where they make healthy dishes such as Asian coleslaw, made with Ramen noodles, cabbage and other accessible ingredients.

Campers were hesitant to taste when a bowl of edamame-baby soybeans popular in Japan-was passed around the room.

"Go ahead and try it," said Christopher Moore, Christiana Care healthy lifestyle coordinator. "Just squeeze the pod, and the beans pop right out."

About half the campers enjoyed the edamame. As for other healthy dishes, Hilda Hernandez, 16, feels good about trying hummus made from chick peas and red peppers.

"I thought it looked funny," she said. "But learning to eat things that are good for you is important if you want to stay healthy."

Already, Hilda has lost two pounds. She is walking more instead of taking the bus.

After lunch, she and the other campers got a rousing workout with Zumba, a Latin-inspired fitness regimen that harnesses the energy of music.

"Zumba is fun and makes me want to keep exercising," said Taylor Ferguson, 15, who has lost four pounds. "Now, I’m doing sit-ups and push-ups at home."

In addition to learning about nutrition and weight management, the teens talk about sex education, drug and alcohol abuse, strategies for being good ambassadors in the community and planning for the future.

Camp FRESH 2010
healthy food choices

Image by Christiana Care
Until this summer, Javiar Emory-Turner had never seen a tomato that wasn’t red.
At Camp FRESH, the 16-year-old Wilmington youth is not only tasting tomatoes that are yellow, green and orange, he is helping to grow and sell the produce.

Even more important, Javiar is taking the lessons he is learning about eating healthy home to his family and neighbors, encouraging them to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables each and every day.

"Before, I only ate fruits and vegetables about once a week," he said. "Now, I’m trying new foods that are healthy. I’m cutting back on sugar. I’m getting exercise."

Started by Christiana Care, Camp FRESH is a nine-week program for 48 young people ages 13-18 from Wilmington, New Castle and Newark, Del. The corner stores in their communities carry few fresh fruits and vegetables, and getting to larger markets with more food choices is sometimes difficult. These young gardeners from city neighborhoods till the soil at Wilmington Urban Farm, a verdant plot bursting with broccoli and bok choy, carrots and cabbage, zucchini and zinnias. By growing and eating healthy produce, the teens grow a healthy respect and appreciation for the value of nutrition, and they model their new respect for nutrition to others in the community, who also improve their diets-and, ultimately, their overall well being.
Christiana Care launched Camp FRESH in 2006 as part of the health system’s efforts to build an awareness of the value of nutrition, make a dent in obesity and improve the quality of life for these participants.

Two days a week, the teens sell produce at two stands in urban neighborhoods, one at the farm on East 12th Street and the other at Wilmington Hospital. On the other days, the youths gather at the Eugene du Pont Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation Institute, where they make healthy dishes such as Asian coleslaw, made with Ramen noodles, cabbage and other accessible ingredients.

Campers were hesitant to taste when a bowl of edamame-baby soybeans popular in Japan-was passed around the room.

"Go ahead and try it," said Christopher Moore, Christiana Care healthy lifestyle coordinator. "Just squeeze the pod, and the beans pop right out."

About half the campers enjoyed the edamame. As for other healthy dishes, Hilda Hernandez, 16, feels good about trying hummus made from chick peas and red peppers.

"I thought it looked funny," she said. "But learning to eat things that are good for you is important if you want to stay healthy."

Already, Hilda has lost two pounds. She is walking more instead of taking the bus.

After lunch, she and the other campers got a rousing workout with Zumba, a Latin-inspired fitness regimen that harnesses the energy of music.

"Zumba is fun and makes me want to keep exercising," said Taylor Ferguson, 15, who has lost four pounds. "Now, I’m doing sit-ups and push-ups at home."

In addition to learning about nutrition and weight management, the teens talk about sex education, drug and alcohol abuse, strategies for being good ambassadors in the community and planning for the future.

Dance Your Health Out

July 17, 2012 · Posted in Healthy Food Choices · Comment 

Some cool healthy food choices images:

Dance Your Health Out
healthy food choices

Image by Christiana Care
Christiana Care hosted women from across New Castle County, Del., for an evening designed to inspire attendees to improve their health through exercise and smart nutrition choices.

Combining dance, fun and education, the first ever Dance Your Health Out event, held at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Wilmington, provided free Zumba instruction, healthy food preparation demonstrations and health screenings to more than 200 women.

Attendees took part in a 50-minute Zumba workout led by instructor Davi Mozie that had them dancing, clapping and moving to the music. Zumba combines Latin and international rhythms with a fun, aerobics-style workout. The group included women of all ages—from teenagers to a woman in her 90s—with varying movement abilities, including “newbies” and skilled dancers.

Christiana Care employee Cindy Noble was one of the more experienced dancers in attendance, having lost 47 pounds in the past year thanks to Zumba and an improved diet. She was impressed by the number of first-time dancers at Dance Your Health Out.

“Every time I would turn around just to see what was going on in the room, I was amazed at the volume of people who were there dancing and into it,” Noble said. “People kept coming onto the floor, and they weren’t intimidated.”

“I think the group was exceptionally energetic,” commented Mozie. “When we got started I really didn’t think they would be able to last. We ended up going 10 minutes longer than we had planned because the group just didn’t want to stop. It was great.”

Others took advantage of the free health screenings available throughout the evening. Staff from Christiana Care’s Imaging Services and Center for Heart & Vascular Health assessed attendees’ risk for bone and heart disease, while members of Christiana Care’s Department of Family & Community Medicine calculated body-mass index and provided body-fat analyses.

Following Zumba, Jenn Barr, with Christiana Care’s Center for Community Health, conducted a healthy-cooking demonstration. Attendees sampled low-calorie dinner options provided by caterer Food for Thought and learned about the importance of nutrition in maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

A post-event survey of attendees offered insight about the effectiveness of the inaugural event. More than 97 percent of respondents said they were motivated to eat healthier and increase their physical activity.

The event was a collaboration of several departments within Christiana Care, including: Women’s Health Services; the Center for Heart & Vascular Health; Family & Community Medicine, Center for Community Health; Food and Nutrition Services; Imaging Services; Preventive Medicine & Rehabilitation Institute’s Food & Nutrition Services; Employee Health; and Volunteer Services.

Dance Your Health Out
healthy food choices

Image by Christiana Care
Christiana Care hosted women from across New Castle County, Del., for an evening designed to inspire attendees to improve their health through exercise and smart nutrition choices.

Combining dance, fun and education, the first ever Dance Your Health Out event, held at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Wilmington, provided free Zumba instruction, healthy food preparation demonstrations and health screenings to more than 200 women.

Attendees took part in a 50-minute Zumba workout led by instructor Davi Mozie that had them dancing, clapping and moving to the music. Zumba combines Latin and international rhythms with a fun, aerobics-style workout. The group included women of all ages—from teenagers to a woman in her 90s—with varying movement abilities, including “newbies” and skilled dancers.

Christiana Care employee Cindy Noble was one of the more experienced dancers in attendance, having lost 47 pounds in the past year thanks to Zumba and an improved diet. She was impressed by the number of first-time dancers at Dance Your Health Out.

“Every time I would turn around just to see what was going on in the room, I was amazed at the volume of people who were there dancing and into it,” Noble said. “People kept coming onto the floor, and they weren’t intimidated.”

“I think the group was exceptionally energetic,” commented Mozie. “When we got started I really didn’t think they would be able to last. We ended up going 10 minutes longer than we had planned because the group just didn’t want to stop. It was great.”

Others took advantage of the free health screenings available throughout the evening. Staff from Christiana Care’s Imaging Services and Center for Heart & Vascular Health assessed attendees’ risk for bone and heart disease, while members of Christiana Care’s Department of Family & Community Medicine calculated body-mass index and provided body-fat analyses.

Following Zumba, Jenn Barr, with Christiana Care’s Center for Community Health, conducted a healthy-cooking demonstration. Attendees sampled low-calorie dinner options provided by caterer Food for Thought and learned about the importance of nutrition in maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

A post-event survey of attendees offered insight about the effectiveness of the inaugural event. More than 97 percent of respondents said they were motivated to eat healthier and increase their physical activity.

The event was a collaboration of several departments within Christiana Care, including: Women’s Health Services; the Center for Heart & Vascular Health; Family & Community Medicine, Center for Community Health; Food and Nutrition Services; Imaging Services; Preventive Medicine & Rehabilitation Institute’s Food & Nutrition Services; Employee Health; and Volunteer Services.

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